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Introduction How Rivers Run Stories Value Of A River What We Can Do
Restoring Ups and Downs on the Mississippi
(pg 2 of 11)

In the 1930s the Corps built most of the locks and dams at 29 locations to create a 9-foot-deep channel from Minneapolis to St. Louis. The structures cut the river into sections, creating a series of deep pools for barges but also preventing the migration of fish.

Unable to ascend the river to spawn, the skipjack herring disappeared from the river above Keokuk, Iowa. The ebony shell, once the upper Mississippi's dominant mussel, nearly disappeared as well because its larvae hitchhike in the gills of only one fish, the skipjack herring.

Top: Skipjack herring disappeared from the Mississippi river due to habitat loss after the river was channelized. Left: Ebony shell mussels then became threatened as well because their larvae hitchhike in the gills of only one fish, the skipjack herring.


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Introduction
Whitewater
Mississippi
Straight
Valley Creek
Gulf of Mexico
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