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Introduction How Rivers Run Stories Value Of A River What We Can Do
Life of a River-Biology
Life cycles of terrestrial animals

Many animals rely on a combination of upland and stream habitats in order to complete their life cycles. Both wetlands and sandy uplands are necessary for the Blanding's turtle to complete its life cycle. Fluvial outwash plains, such as those in Weaver Bottoms along the Mississippi River, provide nesting habitat for Blanding's turtles, bullsnakes (also called gopher snakes), hognose snakes, map turtles, tiger beetles, jumping spiders, grassland birds (such as meadowlarks), and more. Fox snakes live in forested riparian habitats.

The rare wood turtle hibernates in rivers, nests on exposed sandy banks, but spends much of its time in nearby upland forests eating berries, mushrooms, insects and earthworms. An ancient resident, wood turtles can live up to 40 years under favorable habitat conditions. Threats to this protected species include illegal harvesting, predation, and vehicles.

Pictured animals: Blanding's turtle, Ouchita map turtle, tiger salamander, wood turtle

wood turtle
See a wood turtle

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Introduction
Flow
Shape
Connections
Quality
Life
Description
Terrestrial plants
Terrestrial animals
Life cycles
Corridors
Refuges
Aquatic habitats
Adaptations
Continuum concept
Relationships
Consequences
Stories
Summary
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