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Life of a River - Biology
Terrestrial animals (pg 2 of 2)

Birds are also attracted to the river corridor. The diversity of species depends on the plant diversity, age classes and width of the corridor. Research has shown that older, larger trees are important habitat for nesting herons, egrets, osprey, eagles, and a variety of declining songbirds. Bald eagles and osprey prefer large white pine and aspen trees near the water for roosting and nesting sites. Kingfishers swoop down from streamside perches to catch their lunch.

In the Minnesota River Valley State Recreation Area, the one remaining stand of intact floodplain forest with large cottonwood and silver maple trees is home to a wide variety of bird species that are not found in other parts of the valley where forests are being selectively logged. Species include red-shouldered hawk, Acadian flycatcher, and cerulean warbler.

The Vermillion River Bottoms along the upper Mississippi River is one of the last places to support Cerulean warblers. Crucial structural requirements for Cerulean warblers in floodplain forests include the presence of tall trees with large upper branches sturdy enough to support nests. Large cottonwood, swamp white oak, and elm trees are particularly good species.

(Green, 1995); (Knutson et al., 1996); (Knutson and Klaas, 1998)

Pictured birds: Osprey, great blue heron, Louisiana waterthrush, scarlet tanager


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Introduction
Flow
Shape
Connections
Quality
Life
Description
Terrestrial plants
Terrestrial animals
Life cycles
Corridors
Refuges
Aquatic habitats
Adaptations
Continuum concept
Relationships
Consequences
Stories
Summary
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