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Introduction How Rivers Run Stories Value Of A River What We Can Do
Life of a River - Biology
Terrestrial animals (pg 1 of 2)

A mosaic of terrestrial plant communities provides more diverse habitats that support more diverse animal communities than homogeneous plant communities, such as cornfields. Fens, marshes, floodplain forests, outwash plains, oxbow lakes, side channels, mudflats, shrub swamps, sand prairies and wet meadows are examples of habitats in river systems that support a rich diversity of life. The physical structure of the habitat in large part determines habitat quality.

Many reptile and amphibian species rely on waterways and their surrounding habitat. Pickerel frogs are closely tied to the forested, coldwater streams in southeastern Minnesota. While bullfrogs have been relocated to a variety of areas throughout Minnesota, the Mississippi River backwaters of southeastern Minnesota are their only naturally occurring habitat in the state.

Fallen trees and logs in rivers and along their banks are important basking sites and provide cover for a variety of animals. Map turtles take cover among branches that have fallen into the water. Other species overwinter amidst the shelter of dense logjams formed during flood events.


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Introduction
Flow
Shape
Connections
Quality
Life
Description
Terrestrial plants
Terrestrial animals
Life cycles
Corridors
Refuges
Aquatic habitats
Adaptations
Continuum concept
Relationships
Consequences
Stories
Summary
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