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Life of a River - Biology
River Continuum Concept: Lower reaches (pg 7 of 7)

As the food base changes in larger reaches, other species of fish are added to the community. For example, paddlefish only occur in large rivers because they are dependent on a plankton diet. Carp, buffalo, and redhorse scour the bottom for worms, midges, and small snails and mussels. Catfish rely on their olfactory sense to find food in turbid water. Fish such as largemouth bass and various sunfish, more typical of lakes, may flourish in quiet backwaters.

Despite these rather predictable patterns, streams will have unique assemblages of plants and animals, depending on climate, geographic location, geologic history, hydrology, and other specific physical characteristics of the stream.

Jodie Hirsch
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Flow
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Quality
Life
Description
Terrestrial plants
Terrestrial animals
Life cycles
Corridors
Refuges
Aquatic habitats
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Continuum concept
Relationships
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