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Introduction How Rivers Run Stories Value Of A River What We Can Do
Life of a River - Biology
Terrestrial plants (pg 1 of 2)

Terrestrial plants along the stream, in its floodplain, and in its valley are vital to the character of the stream. The pattern of vegetation along a stream corridor will depend on climate; disturbance such as flood, erosion, and fire; formation of floodplains; soil type; and soil moisture.

Plant communities form a mosaic, depending on conditions along the stream and in the floodplain. The disturbance of periodic floods provides an opportunity for new plant growth. For example, plains cottonwood, black willow, and silver maple are adapted to taking root in recently deposited sediments. Because these species are able to withstand deposition of sediment and scouring that exposes their root systems, they can outcompete other tree species in a floodplain environment.


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Introduction
Flow
Shape
Connections
Quality
Life
Description
Terrestrial plants
Terrestrial animals
Life cycles
Corridors
Refuges
Aquatic habitats
Adaptations
Continuum concept
Relationships
Consequences
Stories
Summary
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