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Introduction How Rivers Run Stories Value Of A River What We Can Do
Connections of a River - Connectivity
Longitudinal connections (pg 1 of 9)

Longitudinal connectivity refers to the pathway along the entire length of a stream. A gradient of physical, chemical, and biological processes occur from source to mouth.

A string of dams that blocks the free flow of water and sediment downstream and movement of fish upstream and downstream is only the most obvious example of the loss of longitudinal connectivity.

The concept also applies to the cycling of nutrients, continuum of habitats, influx of organic materials, and dissipation of energy.

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Reservoirs create sediment build-up

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Dams often flood out critical habitats

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Erosion happens in the tailwaters

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A reservoir initiates nutrient build-up

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Introduction
Flow
Shape
Connections
Description
Longitudinal
Lateral
Vertical
Temporal
Quality
Life
Summary
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