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Introduction How Rivers Run Stories Value Of A River What We Can Do
Connections of a River - Connectivity
Vertical disconnects (pg 5 of 7)

The unintended consequence of this type of vertical disconnect degrades the QUALITY of the water. Such vertical disconnects can also redistribute the quantity of water in local spots. Runoff is forced to bypass surfaces that it would normally percolate through (lower levels at point a) and is instead rerouted to other receiving water bodies (higher levels at point b).

The effect of these sorts of disruptions is particularly ruinous to trout streams, which depend on ample flows of cool groundwater. In effect, paving over large areas in a small watershed affects the quality of water supply. The steady supply of cold, clean water with valuable dissolved minerals is replaced by intermittent spates of sediment-laden water of variable temperature. The effect on a trout stream: erratic flows, warmer temperatures, siltation, erosion, rising turbidity-and before long, the loss of trout.

To learn more about impervious surface impacts, read the EPA's fact sheet titled "Managing Urban Runoff" at http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/nps/urban.cfm.


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Vertical
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