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Introduction How Rivers Run Stories Value Of A River What We Can Do
Connections of a River - Connectivity
Description

The most obvious example of connections of a river or connectivity is the free flow of water downstream and the passage of fish upstream. The construction of a high dam across a stream is the most vivid and obvious illustration of fragmentation, the loss of connectivity.

Connectivity takes many subtler forms. Broadly, the term refers to the flow, exchange, and pathways that move organisms, energy, and matter through a stream system. The hallmarks of connectivity are continuity, complexity, and interdependence. This continuum of hydrologic, biological, and chemical interactions extends along four dimensions:

  • Longitudinal (upstream and downstream)
  • Lateral (midchannel to floodplain)
  • Vertical (underground, in the sediment surrounding the channel)
  • Temporal (continuity over time)

(Nilsson and Berggren, 2000)



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Introduction
Flow
Shape
Connections
Description
Longitudinal
Lateral
Vertical
Temporal
Quality
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