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Introduction How Rivers Run Stories Value Of A River What We Can Do
Shape of a River - Geomorphology
Stream classification (pg 1 of 2)

Graphic depicting the stream channel classification system developed by Dave Rosgen. Courtesy of Dave Rosgen, Wildland Hydrology, 2003. Adapted by Steve Adams.

The eight variables important in shaping a stream interact in predictable and measurable ways. For example, the natural form of the low gradient streams characteristic of most of Minnesota is sinuous, narrow, and deep. Steeper rivers found on the North Shore of Lake Superior are less sinuous and have boulder and bedrock rapids more like mountain streams. Many variations on these forms can be found throughout the world.

One of the ways to better understand streams is a classification system developed by Dave Rosgen, (1994). This system helps us predict the form and shape of a stream when faced with changes in the hydrologic regime and the bankfull discharge, loss of stream length due to straightening, or increases in sediment supply.


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Introduction
Flow
Shape
Description
Variables
Bankfull flows
Classification
Sediment
Patterns
Slope
Habitat
Change
Consequences
Stories
Connections
Quality
Life
Summary
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