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Shape of a River - Geomorphology
Description (pg 2 of 2)

Large-scale geologic forces such as uplift, volcanic activity, and glacial erosion and deposition shape the land over which rivers eventually flow. As you would expect, a stream flowing down the steep slope of a mountain appears different from one running through a nearly flat plain of glacial till. A stream flowing over bedrock has different characteristics from one flowing over a bed of sand. Geology sets the stage for what is to come.

As draining water seeks out and establishes a river channel, geomorphological forces are at work. Over time, land may continue to move on a large scale. Much of the Canadian Shield, for example, continues to rebound from the weight of the glaciers; in places the land continues to rise several inches per century. In arctic or alpine regions, glaciers may continue to advance or melt. In geologically active areas, earthquakes or volcanoes may alter streambeds.


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Introduction
Flow
Shape
Description
Variables
Bankfull flows
Classification
Sediment
Patterns
Slope
Habitat
Change
Consequences
Stories
Connections
Quality
Life
Summary
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