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Flow of a River - Hydrology
Description

In the context of stream dynamics, hydrology is the distribution and movement of water through the stream and its floodplain and tributaries.

Water is the most obvious feature of the river. It is vital to life in the stream and the nearby environment. Its movement provides the energy to shape the stream and its surrounding landscape. Its unique physical properties-it floats when it turns to ice and has an unusual ability to retain heat, for example-have important consequences to the stream environment.

The hydrology of a river system determines the appearance and behavior of the stream and its ability to support life and other processes and uses, including those that humans depend on.

There are four variables or dimensions of hydrology:

  • Longitudinal, the movement of water from headwaters downstream to the mouth.
  • Lateral, the ebb and flow of water between the main channel and the floodplain.
  • Vertical, the flux of water underground.
  • Chronological, the flow over time.
Luther Aadland
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The flow through river channels is complex
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Introduction
Flow
Description
Water cycle
Watersheds
Stream order
Factors of flow
Consequences
Stories
Shape
Connections
Quality
Life
Summary
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